Tag Archives: dsd downloads

DSD on DVD Discs – Same Masters as SACD – Plays in your SACD player

DSD Made Easy…

To avoid the 6GB+ download for multichannel DSD64 and 2GB+ for stereo, that still is a problem for many worldwide, not to mention a hassle, I now ship a DVD (Data Disc) with the same album tracks on it.

This disc plays directly from the OPPO or any other SACD/DSD disc player (which is usually the DVD/Blu-ray player too) by just selecting the “Music” option (2nd menu choice on OPPO) instead of “CD” option.

Then you just press Play and it plays the album track by track as native DSD. Exactly the same DSD masters as on the SACDs.

“The Window” SACD has been out of print for many years now and is known to sell as used copies online by others for hundreds of dollars. In addition, I have some of my best-selling DSD albums that have never been printed as SACD, only available as DSD Downloads.

All of these are now available as discs for sale. Not CDs, just DSD on a data disc. They won’t play in a CD player. Only in your SACD player.

Back to the problem for some…DSD Downloads. Not only is downloading sometimes tedious depending on your Internet speed and data limit per month (I only get 10GB/mo here for what I can afford), but you then also need the right computer media player like JRiver or Audirvana or others.  Then you also need the right DSD DAC like OPPO HA-2, or Mytek or AURALiC or others and you need to have all that feed your stereo.  Playing multichannel in this fashion can be more challenging.

Not everyone’s idea of fun in music.  Instead they like to pop a disc into their DVD/SACD player and press play.

You can do it by ordering a DSD DVD Disc here:

http://davidelias.com/dsd_on_dvd_data_discs

No one else has done this that I know of, but that shouldn’t scare you. It’s usually cheaper than buying the SACD but doesn’t come in a fancy package.

Just the highest quality DVD (verified) with a white label, hand made, hand written, signed by me and mailed to you in a solid case within a day or two.  You pay shipping which is added at PayPal checkout, depending on where you are in the world.

So far these have gone as far as from Hawaii to Ireland!

Here are the native DSD albums available as DVD Data discs:

  •  Coffeehouse Playlist #1 (sampler of other DSD albums) – Stereo ($24.95 + shipping)
  •  The Window – Stereo or Multichannel ($24.95 + shipping)
  •  Crossing – Stereo or Multichannel ($24.95 + shipping)
  •  Acoustic Trio DSD Sessions – Stereo ($24.95 + shipping)
  •  Slipper DSD Sessions – Stereo ($19.95 + shipping)

Most of these have a PDF with notes, lyrics and photos you can download from the web page where you buy it.

Another nice thing about DVD Data discs with DSD Masters is that you can back them up!  Just copy the DSD (DSF) files off the disc and save them on your computer. No can do with SACDs.

Yes and you can play those same files through your JRiver or Audirvana or whatever you have on computer to play DSD as well.  No DRM in other words.

Hope that didn’t scare you. It’s supposed to make playing “downloadable” DSD easy. You just put in a disc and press Play.

http://davidelias.com/dsd_on_dvd_data_discs

Aloha to All,

– DE

PS – if you followed all this and you have DSD Downloads already, you probably figured out you can burn your own DVD and play any of them in your SACD player if you want as well.  You don’t need me to do that!

How to Cure the DSD/HRA Download Blues

 

A Cure for the DSD/HRA Download Blues…

Have you had some not so Aloha experiences trying to download some of the big DSD files? 24/192 PCM files are even bigger.

Maybe your Internet connection is not-so-quick.  Maybe your provider dings you for the amount of data you download above 2GB or 4GB each month. Maybe you want more than one album worth of files and don’t have the time to babysit the downloads. Maybe you are into 5.0 surround and know how big those audio files can be (average about 400MB per song as DSD64)…

Whatever the reason you can now purchase a single USB stick with the combo of my DSD albums and mixes (2.0 stereo and 5.0 multichannel) that you want.

You can purchase this option through my web page at
http://www.davidelias.com

The DSD USB Stick offer is good ONLY in the United States!

All my online purchases go through secure PayPal which I’ve used as a merchant online since 1999. They have been a great service to rely on.

If you would like the USB stick shipped to you and do not see the album(s) or mixes combined that you prefer, please reply to this email and let me know what you are interested in.

I ship the USB Stick USPS Priority Mail with tracking and can let you know when it goes out and the tracking number.

You can copy the DSF files from the USB Stick to your PC or Mac or simply plug the stick into your media player like an OPPO and play the songs. Pretty darn simple.


One More Cup of Coffee…

With the launch of Revelation9 at the T.H.E. audio fest in Newport Beach, Calif this weekend, I created my first “curated” playlist of my native DSD songs. The curated idea is not exactly new to me though the term is. It means (to me) that some thought and expression are put into making the playlist for some focused intentions by the curator.

In this case, the curator is me. So my intentions were to create a coffeehouse playlist that reflects some of the power of recording in Direct Stream Digital (DSD) and delivering those mixes to people interested in high resolution audio. All the songs in this playlist are mine ranging in recording sessions from over 10 years ago in Boulder, CO to fairly recently in an offgrid cabin here in Hawaii.

I started my rekindled approach to Independent Acoustic in coffeehouses in the SF Bay Area in the early 90’s. I think coffee and acoustic and DSD for that matter all go together very well.

I wrote about each of the 9 songs in the playlist and more about coffeehouse karma online. You can read about that here…

The Playlist is online for download as well for $15.95. It contains selected tracks from all 3 DSD albums as well as the “Aspen Rose” single. These are stereo mixes.

 David Elias - Coffeehouse Playlist #1

Hope you are having a great weekend.

Aloha!

– DE

DSD Bartender — Give Me A PCM Sandwich!

Direct Stream Digital (DSD)

The great news is that hi-rez (aka hi-res, HRA, or HD) audio is getting lots of renewed attention these days, by the likes of Sony and all kinds of audio loving creators and consumers.

I think that’s a great thing because if we would all just remember to slow down a little and maybe sit down and just listen to some nice music more often (like many of us used to do every day!) then we might all feel just a little better about the rest of what’s going on around us.

At 80 years old, Kurt Vonnegut Jr. wrote that without music our civilization would have ended long ago. I’d have to agree with that. Pursuing a certain quality to whatever kind of music we might listen to is worthwhile. Music isn’t a distraction to many. It’s an essential part of our civilization and our lives.

DSD (Direct Stream Digital) is the High Resolution Audio (HRA in Sony’s acronymous world) that has been around as the media format behind SACD (Super Audio CD) which came out nearly 15 years ago. SACD kind of went invisible for awhile due to lack of the music industry’s support, but now is coming back around for big press and lots of attention and ears (new and renewed).

It has been reborn in the form of DSD Downloads, with the same audio quality of any equivalent SACD.

My question is:  How many people out there think they are listening to DSD and are actually not hearing DSD but a PCM conversion of their DSD source track?

DSD DISTILLED CORRECTLY…

Frequently DSD is being changed (converted) by hardware and software alike into the more ubiquitous PCM format before it reaches your ears.

What’s confusing, or worse is completely unknown to many listeners and audiophiles, are the proper steps required to actually play DSD in its native format. Despite the years that SACD has been around at this point, the proper direct DSD playback from both SACD discs as well as DSD Download audio files (DSF or DFF) is still elusive to or misunderstood by many.

Surprisingly, both SACD’s and DSD Downloads often have similar problems getting played correctly in their intended DSD hi-rez format.

This seems to stem from the ways that audio hardware and software have evolved. They have both followed a PCM (Pulse Code Modulation) dominated path that was based on most of the digital music being recorded and played as CD (PCM) since the early 80’s.

That’s a long, long, time and a whole lotta CDs and iTunes downloads ago… We’ve all been listening to PCM since vinyl LPs, cassettes and 8-tracks went out the window…

So the DACs (Digital to Analog Converters) that were first developed catered to PCM, the same format as CDs (WAV/AIFF). As far as I know, the DACs to this day still require different circuitry to support both PCM and DSD.

The bottom line is that it is neither simple nor cheap to support both standards (DSD and PCM) in the same product. Yet they both exist. In September 2013, Sony announced they felt the CD audio quality consumers were being fed for the past 30 years was not nearly good enough. As a result, they decided to back their own HRA format: DSD! This approach removes the edgy and compressed feeling to the sound you are listening to and instead provides a much more natural and ambient analog-like sound your ears are more comfortable hearing.

When software media players such as Winamp and QuickTime came out in the 90’s, they were meant to play the popular PCM formats (WAV and AIFF)  as well as the ubiquitous compressed MP3 (lossy – meaning audio quality is lost), AAC (Apple lossy) and then the more accurately compressed lossless (meaning quality is not lost) formats such as FLAC for the PC and ALAC for the Mac.

There are many more audio encoding formats and what are called containers for video and/or audio playback. I can show you a list of audio/video encoding formats and containers that is a long as your arm! They all have different approaches to compression vs quality and player compatibility.

By the way, notice any pattern here?  The PC and the Mac never really support the same encoded audio files! The Mac will now even run Windows (under a Lion OS X dual boot), but it won’t play a PC FLAC file…Give me a break!  Things are not better on the PC Windows side playing the Mac ALAC files…Give me 2 breaks! Even the mighty “cloud” won’t help you with this one…

A similar discrepancy has occurred in the HRA world of playing DSD through software media players including Winamp, QuickTime, JRiver, Audirvana, AudioGate, Pure Music, and all the rest. The circuitry does not exist inside the PC or Mac to decode the 1-bit DSD directly to analog!  This is pervasive, but perhaps not that well understood.

There is insufficient hardware (specialized chips) in the typical PC and Mac to play DSD as DSD without PCM conversion. Instead it must first get converted (via software) to PCM to then be played directly through its speaker or headphone audio out jack. (For historical reference, the Sound Reality chip in older Sony Vaio computers could in fact play DSD as DSD but that chip no longer exists in the newer Vaio computers.)

If you are using any of the popular media players such as Audirvana Plus, JRiver, Pure Music, AudioGate, Foobar2000, and if you are listening to DSD without an External DSD DAC (see below), then you are not listening to DSD, you are listening to PCM.  Here’s a list of media players from HighDefTapeTransfers.com

IMPORTANT NOTE: Korg’s AudioGate software does not support an external DSD DAC! There’s no way to hear DSD from the Korg software. You can only hear DSD directly output from one of its MR-series recorders (MR-1 or 2, MR-1000, MR-2000). AudioGate software always plays DSD files (DSF, DFF) as PCM!

AudioGate is a great tool for mastering and converting between many hi-rez audio formats including DSF/DFF (I use it a lot), but it does not offer any DSD playback without converting to PCM, nor does it integrate with USB DSD DACs.

THE DSD DAC SOLUTION

Fortunately, there is a way to listen to native DSD from a PC/Mac without converting it to PCM first.

The solution is to add an external DSD DAC (Digital to Analog Converter) to decode the DSD stream to analog and feed it from there to your amplifier, etc.  The DAC typically connects to your PC/Mac via a USB cable. More recent DSD DACs are USB sticks that connect to the PC/Mac directly and also act as headphone amplifiers…this approach (like in a product called GEEK) just might blow the roof off the cost/value proposition in the market! Other interfaces for popular DACs (old  and new) include Firewire, S/PDIF, AES/EBU and Toslink. DSD DACs usually support PCM as well.

In addition to the original Meitner (EMM Labs) DAC products, DSD DACs now are becoming a beautiful audio bouquet of selection from companies such as Mytek, exaSound, TEAC, PSAudio, and others. Some good DSD DAC lists exist at Positive Feedbackand AudioStream…

SAMPLE THIS….

There are differences in the sample rates supported by all of these things so that’s one more thing to pay attention to as a futureproof type of purchasing if that’s important to you. The original DSD 1-bit sample rate was at 2.8 MHz. This is referred to as DSD64 or 64fs or 64x because it is 64 times the sample rate of the CD (aka Red Book CD) standard of 44.1 KHz (44100 x 64 = 2,822,400).

To achieve even better sonic results, DSD sample rates have increased by factors of 2x (DSD128 at 5.6 MHz) and 4x (DSD256 at 11.2 / 12.2 MHz). Different software and different hardware have different capabilities in this regard. exaSound’s e20 and e28 DSD DACs are some of the early adopters supporting DSD256 in stereo and 8-channels! Pyramix and Horus from Merging Technologies also support DSD256.

DSD – NO PROBLEM……PCM – NO PROBLEM…
IF IT SOUNDS GOOD…IT IS GOOD!

I have no dispute to settle. I like good sound. I like to make good sounding recordings. It can be on a cassette in a boom box or DSF file being played and sent analog to that same boom box. It can be an iPhone sitting on a pallet out in the yard turned up like an AM radio from the 70’s. And no, not everything sounds good to me…

In many ways, listening carefully to DSD since 1999 has taught me to appreciate a good recording no matter what device or media it is playing through. I have come to call this the Art of Listening.

Roger Powell gave me the confidence back in the early 90’s to accept the fact that “if it sounds good, it is good. Thank you Roger!  I was trying to make the first “really good” recordings of my life at that point, having done lots of messing around for the previous 20 years. The digital DIY revolution was breaking and I was hooked

I was hoping not to screw up. A lot of things that I used and did for those 90’s recordings were dirt simple at the time, yet still just sounded good (honest, accurate, clean, natural) compared to most of what I was listening to on home recordings and many pro recordings. My sound was nearly all acoustic so that made it easier to evaluate for these attributes of clean, natural, etc.

Roger’s answer to my “is this good quality?” questions gave me the courage to stay on my track. Before too long I would be introduced to DSD by Gus Skinas. I’ve never had to look back or look anywhere else for a truly excellent audo quality resource. I’m not alone. If it sounds good, it is good! DSD has been all of that for me from the very start.

BARTENDER, GIVE ME A SANDWICH!

Say you walk into a bar famous for their home infused jalapeno margaritas. In fact they specialize in all kinds of infused drinks with deep colored bottles lining their shelves.

You sit at the bar and say “Bartender, give me a sandwich!”

He looks at you and shrugs and then goes somewhere and scrounges up a ham and cheese sandwich (maybe from the take out next door) and gives it to you, (Give the customer what they want!). You eat the sandwich and are not too impressed.

Then you go back home to your “Famous Bar Review” webzine work and write something about the poor quality you experienced at what you thought was supposed to be a very high quality establishment.

I’m afraid that this is what too often happens to DSD in its evaluations and comparisons to any other format (analog tape, vinyl, PCM, etc.).

A lot of people are listening to DSD as PCM. This happens if you don’t use the external DSD DAC as described above.  This is also likely to happen if you play the DSD from an SACD player that is using HDMI to connect to an amplifier/receiver or to even a video monitor to display its menus. The transport over HDMI (at least prior to HDMI v1.2) in the mainstream pro and consumer world is always for PCM encoded audio, not DSD.

This is only recently overcome and not usually implemented on the HDMI side of things. Prior to HDMI v1.2 DSD gets converted to PCM for transport to the amp/receiver. With newer HDMI versions, BDP players such as OPPO are now supporting the improved integration with some A/V receivers (some Onkyo, Integra and Yamaha models) where the DSD is preserved over the HDMI transport. There are apparently licensing issues here so DSD support is not guaranteed. You have to check with the manufacturer and spec for each model at both ends.

They have also gotten around this on the software USB side (PC/Mac media player to DSD DAC) using what’s referred to as DoP (DSD over PCM). DoP manages to keep the DSD intact and unconverted when it leaves the software player and arrives at the DAC. Other software drivers called ASIO and WASAPI also exist for similar USB DSD DAC integrations.

So….The hardware and software both cater to the PCM market — no problem…unless you want to hear native DSD and you don’t carefully setup and configure the hardware and software you are using for direct DSD.

The default settings for all these products are to convert the DSD to PCM before it is output.

=======================================================

I’ve seen this so many times now that I had to write this post.

=======================================================

It’s like asking that bartender for a sandwich instead of a jalapeno margarita. The finest most exotic and delicious specialty of the house is skipped for what the customer is most used to…

I’ve been on an education type track with hi-rez since well before 2009. I started recording with DSD in 2000 and recorded the self-produced “The Window” in 2002. In 2003 I was taking my SACD disc around to the hi-rez audio retailers in the SF Bay Area asking about all the gear that could play it and testing it out their audition rooms.

Similar issues always existed with the HDMI integration of amplifiers and receivers to SACD players. There can be other default player settings that just convert DSD to PCM for no apparent reason unless you turn it off in the setup configuration. I’ve seen this on Sony BDP players as well as others. Software will always convert to PCM unless you have the right path for it not to (to an external DAC) and set it up (with the right DSD drivers) properly.

People often want to hear my DSD recordings.  If they end up listening to my DSD recordings as PCM conversions, they may be nonplussed with the results, especially as sonic comparisons to other (PCM) recordings they have. I want to help them configure their systems to actually hear the DSD recordings in their native formats. Since they were recorded as DSD, they should be played as DSD.

Usually the response to a changed DSD playback configuration starts with: “Wow!“. The same benefits apply to any other SACD disc or DSD Download audio file played on the same system.

WHAT TO DO, WHAT TO DO…

So I recently created my own checklist for setting up DSD playback. This is so anyone can hear the DSD directly, and not as PCM masquerading as DSD.  It is a pretty confusing product world from one standpoint, but the checklist I came up with is pretty simple.

It is the mental list I’ve used when helping others listen to DSD recordings in their intended way. This list has changed as the whole thing continues to evolve.

So here’s my current Checklist to try to help others listen to native DSD if at all possible. There may be exceptions! In fact, I can think of a few. No matter. It is written for the general and common systems out there.

DE’s DSD PLAYBACK CHECKLIST

1. BEWARE: If you are using a computer’s analog audio jack (headphones/audio or line output), then software as a PC/Mac Media Player ALWAYS plays DSD as converted to PCM, not native DSD.

2. So….An External DSD DAC connected to a PC/Mac via USB is required in order to play the native DSD from a Media Player. This also includes a requirement for proper hardware (DAC) driver configuration on the computer. (The “driver” is software!).

Popular External DSD DACs are available from companies such as exaSound, Mytek, TEAC, Meitner, PSAudio and many others. A good list is here from AudioStream…

3, BEWARE: HDMI (v1.1) converts DSD to PCM before playback and therefore should be avoided when critiquing or trying to fully enjoy DSD audio quality. You can investigate HDMI (v1.2 and later) to see if DSD playback is being supported by your specific BDP (player) and A/V Receiver or Pre/Pro products.

CAUTION
: Enabling HDMI Output on your SACD/DSD player may cause DSD to automatically be converted to PCM on any direct output. This is currently true on OPPO 103/105 models. Check with the manufacturer for your player.

4. The best and simplest audio quality solution from a DSD/SACD player is usually to seek the configuration/setup that sends DSD directly to the analog RCA outputs (L/R stereo or 5.1 Mch).  You also need to enable DSD (instead of PCM) on SACD Output!

5. Finally, most DSD players (hardware and software) give some indication on a screen somewhere of what they are really playing based on their configuration.

Read the screen! 

This can be the media player (software) screen, or the SACD/Blu-ray player (hardware) display.  If it doesn’t say “DSD” or “SACD” and says “PCM”, or AIFF or ALAC, or WAV or FLAC or anything else, then it’s probably converting the DSD to PCM before it sends it to your amplifier or elsewhere. You may need to disable HDMI Output and/or enable DSD on SACD Output.

ONE MORE SIDE NOTE…… If you are using an OPPO BDP (103/105) and are playing DSD Downloads that you have on a USB stick, the OPPO and HDMI video screen displays do not tell you whether you are listening to PCM or DSD!

This is true for the latest firmware dated July 2013.

I was told by OPPO that the player will follow the SACD setup when playing USB DSD file (DSF/DFF).  So if you see “PCM” in the display when an SACD disc is playing, then you need to fix your setup as described above (HDMI Output = Disabled, SACD Output = DSD).

Then go get a good margarita and enjoy yourself!

dsd

dsd

 

push me some surround – multichannel dsd downloads

Direct Stream Digital (DSD)

Direct Stream Digital (DSD)

It was bound to happen, I just didn’t know when. But as of today I have added the 5.1 multichannel mixes for my 2 released SACDs “The Window” (2003) and “Crossing” (2005) to my online DSD Download offerings.

This is not completely coincidental to the fact that Sony and several audiophile retail outlets have recently announced their commitment to a Hi-Res Audio (HRA) initiative that includes consumer audio products (players, amplifiers, etc.) that support DSD (Direct Stream Digital, the hi-res digital format) as well as DSD download services.

Check out what Sony is doing with DSD Downloads as of just the past week’s annoucement:
http://discover.store.sony.com/High-Resolution-Audio/

More on all of that on an upcoming blog post…it’s draft title is:
when music matters…climbing back out of a sonic hole

DSD Downloads Grow Up…

I released the first DSD Disc download of “The Window” as stereo DSF files in November, 2009. This year I released the same DSF file format for “Crossing”. It was only a question of time before I put the 5,1 surround sound mixes (multichannel or MCH) online for downloads, now that some of the media player software such as foobar2000 supports it, and some of the external DSD DACs out there such as exaSound’s e28 also support it.

It’s a new ready-to-sit-down-and-listen world all over again. We recorded “The Window” directly to DSD almost exactly 11 years ago, in the 3 days prior to the Thanksgiving weekend in Boulder in 2002. Most of the world was still on 56k dialup modems and ISDN BRI was running at 64k. You wouldn’t try downloading a 500MB DSD MCH file (one song!) under that setup.

You can read Brian Moura’s High Fidelity Review accounts of both of these original SACD works when they were first released the links below.  His post this afternoon of my new DSD MCH downloads is at Quadrophonic Quad

The Window (High Fidelity Review – 2003)
http://www.highfidelityreview.com/da…est-album.html

The Window

The Window – DSD stereo and MCH download

David Elias – Acoustic Guitar, Vocal & Harmonica
Sally Van Meter – Dobro, Weissenborn & Lap Steel
Matt Flinner – Mandolin & Bouzouki
Ross Martin – Electric & Baritone Guitars
Eric Thorin – Upright Bass
Marc Dalio – Drums
John Magnie – Keyboards & Accordion

Album Tracks
1. Freedom On The Freeway
2. Summer Wind
3.
Go Down Easy
4.
The Old King
5.
Something About You
6.
Half An Hour Away (Intro)
7.
Half An Hour Away
8.
Her Name Is A.
9.
Transcendental Deprivation Part III
10.
Season Of The Fall
11.
The Window (Intro)
12.
The Window
13.
Picture Of Nothing
Crossing (High Fidelity Review – 2005)
http://www.highfidelityreview.com/ne…und-sound.htm

Crossing - DSD stereo and MCH download

Crossing – DSD stereo and MCH download

David Elias – Acoustic Guitar, Vocal & Harmonica
Sally Van Meter – Weissenborn Guitar & Dobro
Matt Flinner – Mandolin
Eric Thorin – Upright Bass
Eric Moon – Keyboards & Accordian
Marc Dalio – Drums
Chris Kee – Upright Bass
David Philips – Pedal Steel
John Harvard – Electric Guitar
Peter Tucker – Drums
Reid Dennis – Percussion
Eric Humphrey – Organ

Album Tracks
1. Crossing (Lonely Bells)
2. Mend My Mind
3. Close My Eyes
4. Morning Light / Western Town
5. Rodeo On A Ridge
6. Red Tail Guide
7. Heaven’s Destiny
8. One More Savior
9. Above The Creek
10. The Riddle Song
11. Changing Down
12. If I Had My Way

Why Surround?

There were some very specific goals that I had in mind for these surround projects which Brian’s articles refer to.  To list them succinctly:

  • minimal micing
  • live studio stereo mixes of the performance and the room to provide natural reverb in the mixes (stereo and surround)
  • a minimal 8 tracks on the Sonoma DSD recorder to be able to more directly recreate the ambient surround characteristics of the band in a semi- (The Window) or full circle (Crossing)
  • live performances in good studios to capture the natural bleed and ghosting of the instruments across the mics using no isolation, even for the drum kit
  • no edits or overdubs for 99% of the sessions to accomplish accurate acoustic reproduction
  • lots of space :)

From Brian’s articles there are quotes of mine stating both projects’ intentions:

“The Window has gone from being simply an idea of recording an acoustic band, live in a studio, to being a Super Audio CD (SACD) in Surround Sound (Multichannel). We recorded material live as a full band for 3 days. The multichannel result is something you don’t often get to hear. A 5.1 surround sound playback of a live studio recording without cut/paste edits or overdubs. Both the texture and the space come through in the playback, and are most present when listening to the disc on an SACD multichannel audio system. If it sounds “really live” it’s because it was recorded that way in Direct Stream Digital (DSD) with multichannel playback in mind. It’s as if you are sitting in the middle of the studio listening to the band recording.”

On Crossing…

“Philosophically and creatively I really prefer 8 tracks if possible. This keeps micing to a minimum which has benefits and I think lends to the more natural recreation of the ambient space in both surround and stereo. The other advantage for me with 8 tracks is that the DSD recordings are digitally mixed on the Sonoma which keeps it first generation all the way through to the DSD layer you are hearing.”

“Most of these songs were recorded as live takes with no overdubs. Exceptions to that approach are tracks 4, 9 and 12 [Crossing] which introduced the electric instruments as overdubs. This SA-CD was recorded directly to DSD and captured the natural ambient characteristics of the band and the room with the intention of mixing for both Stereo and 5.1 Surround Sound. With that in mind, we used a minimal approach to microphones and seated the musicians in a circle.”

Brian’s summary critique reads like this:

“When describing the sound of Elias’ previous Super Audio CD release The Window, I described it as ‘a reference quality recording’. Crossing is clearly in the same category and some might even say it sounds a bit better.”

Why DSD??

This post just went up on Positive Feedback Online as a reblog of mine. Chief Editor David W. Robinson was kind enough to do the layout and post it with photos and text I had provided him with. It is relevant to the whole discourse here… My Blogosphere Thoughts on DSD

If you are an audiophile and are getting into multichannel DSD playback or are thinking about it, both of these album downloads ($24.95) are Pure DSD without edits and overdubs except the electric guitar and pedal steel added to the 3 tracks mentioned above. I’m thrilled that the consumer products out there in the forms of both software media players and hardware DSD USB DACs allow the discerning listeners to get to the very very nice artistic side of tech + art = art...

I sure hope all this paves the way for more artists to turn to DSD as their recording media of choice,

Aloha!

Feel free to post your comments!

Feel equally free to contact me with questions you have using the contact form on my web site!  http://www.davidelias.com/contact.html